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Pure Forskolin Extract for asthma And Other Uses

It is still not very clear to me whether this natural extract is effective for asthma. Results of studies have not been very convincing. Forskolin compared with beclomethasone for prevention of asthma attacks: a single-blind clinical trial. Patients with mild or moderately persistent adult asthma were randomly assigned to receive forskolin (one 10-mg capsule orally per day) or beclomethasone (two 50 microg inhalations every 12 h) for 2 months. No statistically significant improvement occurred in any lung function parameter in the forskolin-treated patients. There was no statistically significant difference between both treatment groups for any lung function parameter at baseline or after treatment. None of the beclomethasone-treated patients had an asthma attack and one forskolin-treated patient had a mild asthma attack during the 2-month study period.


Forskolin versus sodium cromoglycate for prevention of asthma attacks: a single-blinded clinical trial. Forty patients of either sex with mild persistent or moderate persistent asthma were assigned randomly to 6 months of treatment with forskolin at 10 mg a day orally (capsules) or with two inhalations of sodium cromoglycate every 8 h, three times a day. The number of patients who had asthma attacks during the treatment period was significantly lower among those receiving forskolin than among those receiving sodium cromoglycate. Forskolin caused dose-dependent relaxant effects on resting tone and on leukotriene C4, leukotriene D4, and carbachol-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle. Moreover, with propranolol pretreatment the relaxant effect on tracheal smooth muscle did not change, whereas with the same pretreatment the relaxant effect of isoproterenol diminished. These results suggest that it relaxes airway smooth muscle in guinea pigs in vitro and in vivo by raising tissue cyclic AMP levels and that its actions are independent of beta-adrenoceptors. Forskolin may boost the ability of antibiotics to kill E. coli -- the bacteria responsible for 90 percent of bladder infections. In studies in mice, Duke Microbiologist Dr. Soman N. Abraham found that E. coli bacteria hide in cells lining the bladder, out of reach of antibiotics.